A Kingdom Made of Red Bricks, Patan Durbar Square, Lalitpur City, Nepal

patan durbar square
The mere mention of Patan Durbar Square reminded me not of the series of magnificent ancient courtyards and temples but what imparts impression the most is witnessing a group of ladies carrying heavy rucksack full of red bricks.

A task often associated and performed by strong men, I’m not sure for which purpose they will be using these bricks that they are carefully collecting, but seeing how the square was basically built by using red bricks, it gave me an instant confirmation that it will be used for another shop or house being constructed somewhere on the back corner or as an extension of the square.
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Located across the Bagmati River, a bus ride away from the neighbouring city of Kathmandu, Patan Durbar Square is the center of township of Patan or also known as Lalitpur City.

Another UNESCO World Heritage Site, another beautiful place to explore and admire the one of a kind architecture of Newa People.
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Comprising of the former residential palace of Lalitpur’s Malla king, a total of 136 courtyards and 55 major temples dedicated to religion of Buddhism and Hinduism plus a musuem, to enjoy Patan Durbar Square is similar to how you will enjoy Kathmandu Durbar Square- find a spot, sit down among the visiting locals, with no conversation necessary nod and smile as a way of acknowledgement and just simply let your eyes wander across.
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Like Kathmandu, the real charm of Durbar Square apart from the ancient architectures are those small alleyways that will make you feel as if you discovered something no other tourist has venture to, but after minutes of circling around you will be surprised to find yourself ending up exactly where you started.
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These back alleyways are often extension of the Square itself,   a residential and business area for locals. Same as the ancient temples and courtyards, these souvenir shops and cafeteria  are made up of red bricks,  an intentional or maybe mandatory  rules to preserve the over-all ambiance of the square.
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Last stop for an interesting day around Kathmandu valley.

7 thoughts on “A Kingdom Made of Red Bricks, Patan Durbar Square, Lalitpur City, Nepal

  1. this reminds me of a Malaysian city that has red bricks everywhere its town as well, think its Melaka. there’s an odd way of how the colour red literally transforms a city to another dimension!

  2. I came across your travel blog. I read some of your posts and they are such good reads on Nepal.

    I have a similar travel blog called Gorgeous Nepal which is a Nepal dedicated travel blog aimed at sharing travel experiences and stories from Nepal. We aim to help potential travelers navigate Nepal through fellow travelers experience and stories.

    If your are interested to share your Nepal experience or stories you can share it with us. We allow already published post and also include your shot bio at the end in (parentheses) and possible links you want it to linked back where-ever you want.

    The link to submit your stories/experience: http://gorgeousnepal.tumblr.com/submit
    or you can email at: gorgeousnep {at}gmail{dot}com

    P.S: Nice pictures of Nepal 🙂 great blog.

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