Largest Stupa, Prayer Wheels & Tibetan Exiles at Boudhanath, Kathmandu, Nepal

boudhanath, nepal
I received a bad news. The Nepal-Tibet border was closed for foreign travelers; this according to the many travel agents in Thamel that I talked to, which according to them is based on the latest decision from China. They said that maybe after a week or so, China will change their mind again but without any assurance as to when exactly.

Some travel agents were telling me that there is a way for a right amount but despite my overwhelming desire to see Lhasa, I wouldn’t take the risk of uncertainty and danger, so for now I will try to find a piece of Tibet in Nepal.
boudnath
boudnath
boudnath
boudnath
boudnath
boudnath

Located at the north eastern side of Kathmandu, Boudhanath is the closest to Tibet that I can reached.

Dominated by the massive white stupa structure in the middle said to be the world’s largest, Boudhanath is a holy Buddhist site and home to many Tibetan exiles since 1950’s.
boudnath
boudnath
boudnath

To admire the stupa from one angle is not enough, one must do like a Buddhist do, circle the stupa clockwise and while doing so turn the prayer wheels and ring the bells.
boudnath
boudnath
boudnath
boudnath
boudnath

Apart from the small prayer wheels outside, inside the stupa complex is an even bigger prayer wheel. I discovered it by following the lead of several women whom I was walking behind.
boudnath
boudnath

If from afar, the eye of the stupa is a hypnotizing view, looking at a closer angle makes it even more magnificent. The structure is simply massive and the white concrete spherical structure said to entomb the remains of Kassapa Buddha.

Prayer flags are always a source of happiness for me for unexplained reason. Maybe it is the colours or maybe because I don’t understand what was written on the piece of clothing, nonetheless one of the best feeling that I remember on the entire journey has to be standing right below a rope of swaying prayer flags.
boudnath

Setting aside the touristy aspect of Boudhanath or even the accolades of being a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the significant of Boudhanath above all else is how it symbolizes freedom for the Tibetan exiles.

Around the watchful eye of the stupa, they built their houses, their community and their livelihood. The shops and restaurants at the complex is what I can only assume are mostly owned by Tibetan merchants.

At Boudhanath, they can practice their faith without any fear of resistance and they can live their lives the way they always aspire it to be.
boudnath
boudnath
boudnath
boudnath
boudnath
boudnath
boudnath
boudnath
boudnath

It might be years before I will have an opportunity to travel again at this region, maybe by that time the border will be open or maybe not, for now Boudhanath is more than enough.

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12 thoughts on “Largest Stupa, Prayer Wheels & Tibetan Exiles at Boudhanath, Kathmandu, Nepal

  1. Have you considered (consistently with time and resources) flying to Leh, in Ladak? It doesn’t have the grandeur of Lhasa, but Tibetan tradition and culture are still there, without all the damages brought by Chinese domination…

  2. “It might be years before I will have an opportunity to travel again at this region.” I loved this series. Thank you so much for taking us with you.

    Now here’s a very important question. When, dear nomad, are you going to visit southern Africa? ^^

    1. Hey Ru, how are you? It would be a dream come true to visit and explore South Africa! I hope one day soon 🙂

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