Re-introducing Tokyo Station


A year ago, my first order of blogging business in Japan is to find where the “real” Tokyo is. I don’t intend to confuse you, I know Tokyo is such a huge capital with many branching wards and districts, but I want to be at that specific place where I can photograph myself and upload it at Facebook with a cheesy caption of “Me at Tokyo Station!”.

Sadly, the station itself during that time was nothing but a mere transit point due to the on-going restoration. With tarpaulins, bulldozers and possibly round the clock construction work, there is nothing particular to talk about Tokyo Station apart from how I often I got lost inside and often take the wrong exit.

Like many Japanese and residing foreigners, I was so excited when finally the much waited unveiling of the newly, restored, century old Tokyo Station took place last first week of October. Will it be too much to say that I am more excited to see the renovated station than the Tokyo Sky Tree?
tokyo station
tokyo station

Originally constructed in 1914 and heavily damaged during World War II, Tokyo Station’s distinctive red-brick, gothic style building offers a remarkable contrast to the high rise office buildings of Maranouchi district.
tokyo station
tokyo station

For this reason alone, much credit and admiration goes to the administration and the Japanese people for keeping this historical architecture at the same form and look even a century had passed. I guess, this offers one of the most prevailing contrasts that Tokyo or Japan in general accomplished extremely well, that is if we often look beyond the anime or maid café’s of Akihabara.
tokyo station
tokyo station

The adoration for the renovated station is overwhelming and as expected, crowd gathers outside. I never seen so many people lingering around the station vicinity before, but out of the entire crowd the one that stood out for me are the old, well-dressed gentleman, they just blend in with the aesthetics perfectly.
tokyo station
tokyo station
tokyo station
tokyo station

The red-brick Maranouchi station building is actually the location of Tokyo Station Hotel. Obviously, non-staying visitors are not allowed to loiter inside though I try to sneak in and see what’s inside.
tokyo station
tokyo station
tokyo station

Outside, the highlight of the Maranouchi façade is the European style dome and inside the same can be said, as you can see number of people were looking up with a camera phone in hand for a souvenir photo.
tokyo station
tokyo station
tokyo station
tokyo station

To wrap this post, here are some of the pictures inside Tokyo Station. There are still a lot of finishing touches going on inside and on the other exit points, but all in all the approximate 400,000 red-brick building is more than enough for the moment.
tokyo station
tokyo station
tokyo station
tokyo station
tokyo station
tokyo station

Don’t ask me which exit you should take of you want to go to the Imperial palace or what train platform is the Narita Express located, even after more than a year I still get lost in Tokyo Station.

25 thoughts on “Re-introducing Tokyo Station

  1. I love Tokyo Station. The first time I saw it, it was like seeing a piece of Victorian London, dropped in the middle of Tokyo. Reminded me of home. The renovation looks very successful. 🙂

    1. thanks!
      must be interesting to see it as well prior renovation. but basing on your comments and others who have seen it before, seems like it was done successfully.

    1. agree with you!
      the years of scaffolding and waiting for the unveiling is worth it. restored beautifully 🙂

  2. It’s a magnificent building, and it’s been restored beautifully. I think it’s extra beautiful because it forms such a sharp contrast with the glass-and-chrome skyscrapers around it. It’s like a graceful dowager duchess surrounded by flashy flirts.

    Better than Sky Tree, though? Eeek! You can’t do that to me! Can’t we love both? 😀

    1. i used to love Sky Tree but after my numerous failure attempting to secure a ticket to go inside, i don’t like it much 🙂
      kidding of course ! agree we can love them both 🙂

  3. nice photos. can you tell us a little more about it? Why is it european style? was this build back when Japan was trying to modernize? what was it Meiji restoration? My learning from Intro to modern east asia history class is getting fuzzy..

  4. It looks beautiful, your photos always do. I have only ever seen the station during renovations on our visits over the past couple of years, I can’t wait to see it now its finished.

    Thanks for sharing you beautiful pictures and adventures in Japan

  5. Beautiful photographs. It s amazing to see this old world architecture among those high rise . I am sure Japanse will cherish this place.
    Thanks for this lovely post.

    1. thank you! 🙂
      i agree with you. one of the best thing in Tokyo or in Japan in general is the mix of old and new..

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