Hiking Mt. Jinba


After my amazing experience reaching Mt. Fuji summit, I thought that my fascination with mountains and hiking will died down and I will be back to my ordinary weekends of roaming around the beaten streets of Tokyo. But the effect is quite the opposite; I am now officially a mountain and hiking junkie.

Almost completing the best day hikes away from the city, there is only one mountain left on my list- Mt. Jinba. Though most people will suggest doing the hike in combination with Mt. Takao, I purposely plan my start-finish at Mt. Jinba only to avoid the overwhelming crowd at Takao-san, after all the greatest reward of hiking is the peace and quite, a time to have nature by yourself.
mt. jinba
mt. jinba

To reach the start of Mt. Jinba trail, head to the north exit of Takao Station and look for bus stop no.1, for approximately 30 minutes journey it will bring you to Jinba Kogen Shita. Since the bus departs on one per hour basis, I took note of the return journey to plan my hiking time.

From here you need to pass by a small community and an elevated paved road leading to a parking lot which I assume is a closer walk towards the peak of Mt. Jinba. I was doubtful if I was taking the correct path but after 30 minutes, I saw the signage that leads to the actual start of the trail.
mt. jinba
mt. jinba
mt. jinba
mt. jinba
mt. jinba

Located between Tokyo and Kanagawa prefecture, hiking Jinba-san is by far the easiest that I’ve done. With an elevation of only 857 meters, you don’t need hiking shoes to conquer the trail, though I often find myself out of breath. I guess after a few weeks of rest, my hiking ability was getting rusty.

True to my initial prediction, there were only a handful of people I came across along the trail. For most part, I often find myself alone and surrounded by my favorite rows of trees.
mt. jinba
mt. jinba
mt. jinba
mt. jinba
mt. jinba
mt. jinba

After an hour, I saw the 3 meter high statue of white horse representing the meaning of the word “Jin-ba” (military camp horse), which means I reached the peak.
mt. jinba
mt. jinba
mt. jinba

With no shrine or temples to visit, I settled on doing what others are doing, eat or have a drink on the several huts at the summit while admiring the view.
mt. jinba
mt. jinba
mt. jinba

This is my official hiking food- bowl of hot udon, a bar of snickers, and coke.
mt. jinba

After a few minutes, I started my descend taking the same route. Most of the hikers will continue their journey most probably traversing other smaller mountains nearby.

Hiking Mt. Jinba is not hike for a temple visit or to locate a waterfalls, it is purely an activity and alternative for those like me who cannot resist the urge to spend a Saturday on top of mountains.

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31 thoughts on “Hiking Mt. Jinba

  1. I didn’t visit Mt. Jinba but I did climb Mt. Takao. As you say, it was very busy but I had a wonderful day. I still have one of the wooden sake cups I bought as omiyage. These are lovely pictures. It sounds like you are well and truly hooked. I wish now I’d visited Mt. Jinba also.

    1. agree with you.. Mt.Takao though crowded all the time, personally is the one I recommend to anyone who wants to introduce themselves to the hiking culture in Japan.

      thank you!

  2. The horse statue looks amazing!!! The hiking path looks calm and surrounded by trees. It will make our journey quite comfortable.

    1. yeah, i agree with you..it was a nice hike over-all, though i don’t understand at first why there is a horse statue 🙂

  3. the views are simply splendid! hiking can never be a boring activity. the views atop mountains are just never the same!

  4. I’m so glad you’re a junkie. That means I can get a regular fix via your blog!

    I’m especially glad you wrote this post. I’d love to do this walk, because it’s quiet. (I’ve always avoided the famous Takao-san because those trails look like Chuo-dori in Ginza on a Sunday morning.)

    PS: “This is my official hiking food – bowl of hot udon, a bar of snickers, and coke … AND S&B SHICHIMI TOGARASHI”! 😀

    1. thank for mentioning S&B SHICHIMI TOGARASHI 🙂
      how can i survive eating udon without the flavoring of S&B?

      you are spot on about Takao-san and Ginza Chuo-dori comparison 🙂

    1. agree with you! i spent a good 3 years in Indonesia but never once thought of climbing or hiking, which is a shame actually..
      i must return 🙂

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